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Canada  

Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer shipments to slow down

Revising vaccine plans

Quebec and Ontario, the two provinces hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic, say a decision by drugmaker Pfizer-BioNTech to slow vaccine shipments in the coming weeks will mean changes to their respective game plans.

Ontario's Chief Medical Officer of Health David Williams said the company's decision to delay international vaccine shipments to upgrade production facilities will likely have an effect on the province, though the full impact of the move is not yet known.

Williams said in a statement today that long-term care residents, caregivers and staff who already received their first dose of Pfizer's vaccine will receive their second dose between 21 and 27 days later, no more than a week longer than originally planned.

But that time frame will be longer for anyone else receiving the Pfizer vaccine, with second doses being delivered anywhere from 21 to 42 days after the initial shot.

Quebec Health Minister Christian Dube said Friday the reduced shipments mean that 86,775 of the 176,475 doses of the vaccine expected until Feb. 8 won't be delivered as planned.

Health officials are establishing a new distribution plan, but the Quebec Health Department said the strategy to immunize as many people as possible within priority groups will be maintained.



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'It was joyous:' Sun returns to some Nunavut communities for first time in weeks

Sun finally returns to north

A sliver of orange rose over Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, earlier this week, tinting the sky pink and the snow a purple hue.

The sun washed over the frozen tundra and sparkling sea ice for an hour — and was gone.

Monday marked the return of the sun in the Arctic community of about 1,700 after six weeks of darkness, but an overcast sky that day meant the light couldn't get through. Pamela Gross, Cambridge Bay's mayor, said the town gathered two days later, on a clear day, to celebrate.

Gross, along with elders and residents, rushed down to the shore as the darkness broke around 10 a.m.

"It was joyous. It's such a special feeling to see it come back," Gross said.

Elders Mary Akariuk Kaotalok and Bessie Pihoak Omilgoetok, both in their 80s, were there. As Omilgoetok saw the sun rise, she was reminded of a tradition her grandparents taught her. Each person takes a drink of water to welcome and honour the sun, then throws the water toward it to ensure it returns the following year.

Gross filled some Styrofoam cups with water and, after taking a sip, tossed the rest at the orange sky behind her.

"I didn’t know about that tradition before. We learned about it through her memory being sparked through watching the sun rise."

Although the sun's return was a happy moment, the past year was especially difficult for the community, Gross said. She wouldn't elaborate.

"Being such a small community, people really know each other, so we feel community tragedies together. There were a few that we’ve gone though this year," she said.

Gross said restrictions on gatherings caused by the COVID-19 pandemic meant losses in the community felt even more heavy.

"It made it extra challenging to be close as a community ... and for your loves ones if they’re going through a hard time."

Getting the sun back helps.

"It's hard mentally to have a lack of sun, but the feeling of not having it for so long and seeing it return is so special. You can tell it uplifts everyone."

The return of the sun is celebrated in communities across Nunavut. Igloolik, off northern Baffin Island, will see the sun return this weekend. But the community of about 1,600 postponed its annual return ceremony to March because of limits on gathering sizes during the pandemic.

In the territory's more northern areas, the sun slips away day by day in the fall, then disappears for months at a time. Grise Fiord, the most northern community in Nunavut, loses sun from November to mid-February. But in the summer, the sun stays up 24 hours a day.

Now that the sun has returned in Cambridge Bay, the community will gain 20 more minutes of light as each day passes.

“The seasons are so drastic. It really gives you a sense of endurance knowing that you can get through challenging times," Gross said.



Less pomp, very different circumstances as D.C. prepares to inaugurate Biden, Harris

D.C. prepares to inaugurate

Some pomp. Very different circumstances.

Inauguration day is supposed to be a star-spangled showcase of inalienable democratic spirit, the sort of patriotic, bunting-festooned display that only happens in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Instead, Wednesday's ceremony making Joseph R. Biden, Jr., the 46th president of the United States is liable to feel more like a shotgun wedding.

"It is going to look like a country under siege," said Brett Bruen, a consultant and former U.S. diplomat who worked as an adviser in Barack Obama's White House.

The 2021 inauguration was never going to be the grand affair of past years, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. But the Jan. 6 rampage on Capitol Hill has only made matters worse.

Hundreds of furious Donald Trump supporters, rabid with the president's lies of a grand conspiracy to deny him a second term, overpowered police and stormed the building as Congress was voting to certify Biden's victory.

Five people died, including a Capitol Police officer. The FBI is investigating the possibility there was a plan to make it much worse. And Trump has since been impeached — again — on a single count of "incitement of insurrection."

Law-enforcement officials, meanwhile, are bracing for widespread Trump-friendly protests in the city Sunday, as well as at state capitols from coast to coast, determined to avoid a repeat of last week's violent pandemonium.

In downtown D.C., the legacy of that day is everywhere.

City block after city block, endless spans of imposing iron fence, patrolled by the National Guard, stand in place of the teeming crowds that typically line downtown streets whenever a new president takes the oath of office.

The U.S. Capitol Building, normally a sparkling backdrop to one of American democracy's most sacred rituals, still bears scars from last week's foundation-shaking riots. Some state capitols have boarded up their windows.

The people who usually crowd the National Mall — the iconic expanse of grass between the Capitol and the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument standing sentry in between — will be replaced by a "field of flags," a tribute to their absence.

And instead of the national capital playing host to a 24-hour marathon of black-tie cocktail receptions and glittering gala balls, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser is urging people to stay away.

The images of tens of thousands of armed soldiers, police officers and other law enforcement officials in the streets, guarding the two-metre barriers encircling the Capitol, will be seared into the U.S. consciousness for years to come.

"All because of one man's hurt ego," Bruen said. "It's a sad, shameful moment for our country."

The Canadian Embassy's location on Pennsylvania Ave., with a balcony and rooftop patio just a block from the Capitol, has long made it an ideal venue for watching the proceedings, including the inaugural parade.

In years past, an honour guard of RCMP officers would stand outside the building, saluting the newly anointed president as his motorcade drove past, while diplomatic staff hosted all manner of foreign dignitaries for a ringside viewing party.

"With the parade, you had the marching bands from every state — all 50 states and territories, they had marching bands," recalled Gary Doer, who was Canada's ambassador to the U.S. during Barack Obama's tenure as president.

"Those marching bands will be displaced by marching soldiers. That's just horrible — but necessary."



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GM's $1b deal with Ontario

GM Canada says it has reached a tentative deal with Unifor that if ratified will see it invest $1 billion to transform its CAMI plant in Ingersoll, Ont., to make commercial electric vehicles.

Unifor National President Jerry Dias says along with the significant investment the agreement will mean new products, new jobs and job security for workers.

Dias says in a statement that more details of the tentative deal will be presented to Unifor Local 88 members at an online ratification meeting scheduled for Sunday.

He says the results of the ratification vote are scheduled to be released on Monday.

Details of the agreement were not released Friday night.

A GM spokeswoman says in a statement that the plan is to build BrightDrop EV 600s -- an all-new GM business announced this week at the Consumer Electronics Show that will offer a cleaner way for delivery and logistics companies to move goods more efficiently.

Unifor said the contract, if ratified, will bring total investment negotiated by the union to nearly $6 billion after new agreements were ratified with General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler in 2020 that included support from the federal and Ontario governments.

It said the Ford deal reached in September included $1.95 billion to bring battery electric vehicle production to Oakville and a new engine derivative to Windsor and the Fiat Chrysler agreement included more than $1.5 billion to build plug-in hybrid vehicles and battery electric vehicles.

Unifor said in November, General Motors agreed to a $1.3 billion dollar investment to bring 1,700 jobs to Oshawa plus more than $109 million to in-source new transmission work for the Corvette and support continued V8 engine production in St. Catharines.



In mandate letter, PM tells Freeland to spend on temporary measures until crisis ends

PM: use 'fiscal firepower'

Emergency spending to deal with the COVID-19 crisis must not outlast the pain it's meant to solve, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has instructed Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland in a newly released mandate letter.

The letter has Trudeau tell Freeland, who also serves as his deputy prime minister, that she should use "whatever fiscal firepower" is needed over the coming weeks and months until the economy recovers from the pandemic and its related shutdowns.

But in doing so, Trudeau writes, Freeland must "avoid creating new permanent spending."

He adds that any plan to regrow the economy must be guided by a budgetary goal to make sure spending doesn't go adrift, known in official Ottawa as a "fiscal anchor" that the Liberals have jettisoned as the economy went into a downward spiral.

The details are contained in updated mandate letters the Prime Minister's Office published Friday afternoon, months after it reset the parliamentary agenda with a late-September throne speech.

In a December interview with The Canadian Press, Trudeau chalked up the delayed released of the ministerial marching orders to ongoing changes to federal programs and plans that meant the letters kept needing revisions.

Trudeau said then that at some point, he was just going to have to make them public.

In the letters, Trudeau noted the new marching orders come on top of those given to ministers shortly after the Liberals won a minority mandate in the 2019 federal election.

The letters touch on a number of subjects, from ordering Justice Minister David Lametti to introduce legislation to address systemic issues in the justice system impacting Indigenous Peoples and Black Canadians, to having Seniors Minister Deb Schulte draft new Criminal Code penalties to elder abuse and neglect. The letter for Foreign Affairs Minister Marc Garneau, who was sworn into the new role Tuesday, says Canada-U. S. relations is a top priority.

The letters also make repeated references to greening the Canadian economy. The one for Freeland includes an order that she work on a border carbon adjustment that would essentially impose duties on goods from countries that don't have a price on pollution.

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair is being asked to take action on online hate and extremism in Canada, Health Minister Patty Hajdu to work with provinces on setting national standards for long-term care, and Procurement Minister Anita Anand to get enough COVID-19 vaccines for the country. New Transport Minister Omar Alghabra is tasked with ensuring travellers get refunds for flights cancelled due to the pandemic, but his letter does not mention relief for airlines other than support for "regional air infrastructure."

But it's the government's jump in spending that Trudeau notes in each letter before diving into specifics for each minister.

Unprecedented spending on pandemic aid has rocketed the deficit to an expected $381.6 billion this fiscal year, but the Finance Department has warned it could close in on $400 billion due to the return of widespread lockdowns.

TD Economics, in an end-of-week note, said the economy has entered 2021 on wobbly footing and could suffer a small contraction in the first quarter, even if the ramp up in vaccinations offers hope of a rebound in the second half of the year.

When that happens, the Liberals have promised to spend up to $100 billion on a recovery package that is on Freeland's to-do list, along with preserving the country's "fiscal advantage."

"The government has significantly increased spending during the pandemic in order to achieve our most pressing priority: to help protect Canadians' health and financial security," Trudeau wrote.

"Going forward, we must preserve Canada’s fiscal advantage and continue to be guided by values of sustainability and prudence. Therefore, our actions must focus on creating new jobs and supporting the middle class to preserve the strength of our economy."



N.L. premier dissolves legislature, campaign set to begin

N.L. headed to the polls

Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Andrew Furey's office has confirmed he will make an official election announcement this evening at the provincial legislature.

He asked Newfoundland and Labrador Chief Justice Deborah Fry, who was acting in the lieutenant-governor's absence, to dissolve the legislature at about 3:10 p.m. local time today.

Furey, a surgeon, was elected by the governing minority Liberals to lead the party in August, and a spokeswoman for his campaign says the Liberals have their eyes on a majority.

Their biggest competition will come from the Opposition Progressive Conservatives, led by lawyer Ches Crosbie, son of the famously outspoken politician John Crosbie.

The provincial NDP party, led by economist Alison Coffin, made gains in the last general election in May 2019, winning three seats in the legislature after running just 14 candidates in the province's 40 ridings.

At dissolution, the Liberals held 19 seats, the Progressive Conservatives held 15, the NDP had three and there were three Independents.



Trudeau leaves door open to tighter travel ban, eyeing COVID-19 mutations abroad

Ban on outbound air travel?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is leaving the door open to tighter travel restrictions, including a possible ban on outbound air travel as COVID-19 case counts climb across the country.

“We’re always open to strengthening them as necessary," Trudeau said, referring to measures restricting international flights.

He said the government is keeping a close eye on countries where more easily transmissible strains of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 have broken out.

The prime minister pointed to worrisome mutations in Brazil as well as the United Kingdom, whose outbound flights Canada banned in December.

Those flights have been permitted again after government began requiring incoming air travellers to present proof of recent negative COVID-19 tests before boarding.

“We will continue to look at various variants, various geographies, and make sure we’re taking the right decisions and the right measures to keep Canadians safe," Trudeau said at a press conference at Rideau Hall on Friday.

The choice of whether to bar travel to the United States lies largely with the U.S., not Canada, since the country of arrival has jurisdiction over who enters, he added.

Earlier this month, a survey by Léger and the Association for Canadian Studies found that 87 per cent of respondents said they would support a total ban on international travel until there are several consecutive days of reduced numbers of COVID-19 cases.

Leger vice-president Christian Bourque said that response is consistent with similar questions asked throughout the pandemic, but also reflects a growing desire by Canadians for governments to take stronger action to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Trudeau sought to explain the disparity between stringent lockdown measures such as Ontario's stay-at-home order or Quebec's curfew and the open runway on jetting off to a Caribbean all-inclusive.

“Different jurisdictions will set up the rules that they think are best based on the best advice of their public health officials. On the federal side we have discouraged non-essential international travel, including by imposing mandatory quarantines for anyone returning to Canada and now mandatory testing for anyone before they get on a plane to come back to Canada," he said.

The new curtailments prompted airlines to slash flight schedules over the past week, with Air Canada and WestJet announcing 2,700 layoffs.

Air Transat flight numbers have fallen by more than 90 per cent year over year, the company said.

A ban on non-essential travel would mean a total shutdown, at least for a time, said spokesman Christophe Hennebelle.

"However 'essential travel' is defined, such a ban would probably mean that we would need to stop our operations entirely, unless specific support is granted to help us maintain some form of connectivity," he said in an email.



Government rejection letter sent to Black organizations 'completely unacceptable'

Not 'Black enough'

Several Black organizations were denied federal funding through a program designed to help such groups build capacity — after Employment and Social Development Canada told them their leadership was not sufficiently Black.

Velma Morgan, the chair of Operation Black Vote, said her group received an email from the department on Tuesday saying their application did not show "the organization is led and governed by people who self-identify as Black."

The department sent a second email the next day, saying their applications were not approved because it did not receive "the information required to move forward," she said.

"As if we're incompetent or foolish and we're going to believe the second email over the original email," Morgan said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

She said Operation Black Vote, a not-for-profit, multi-partisan organization that aims to get more Black people elected at all levels of government, is one of at least five Black organizations that were not approved for funding.

Social Development Minister Ahmed Hussen said the initial letter his department sent to unsuccessful applicants was "completely unacceptable" and that he demanded a retraction as soon as he saw it.

In a thread on Twitter Thursday night, Hussen said he discussed with his department's officials how such a mistake could have happened and implemented measures to make sure it does not happen again.

Morgan said the Liberal government should hire more Black people to sit at every decision-making table.

"This is an example of what happens when we don't have representation," Morgan said.



COVID-19 vaccination numbers across Canada

Latest vaccination numbers

The latest numbers on COVID-19 vaccinations in Canada as of Friday, Jan. 15.

In Canada, the provinces are reporting 40,283 new vaccinations administered for a total of 459,492 doses given. The provinces have administered doses at a rate of 1,212.403 per 100,000.

There were 5,850 new vaccines delivered to the provinces and territories for a total of 594,975 doses delivered so far. The provinces and territories have used 77.23 per cent of their available vaccine supply.

Newfoundland is reporting 3,506 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 5,291 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 10.104 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Newfoundland for a total of 11,175 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 2.1 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 47.35 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

P.E.I. is reporting 2,982 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 5,102 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 32.163 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to P.E.I. for a total of 6,075 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 3.8 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 83.98 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nova Scotia is reporting 1,111 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 3,831 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 3.926 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nova Scotia for a total of 13,450 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 28.48 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

New Brunswick is reporting 2,713 new vaccinations administered over the past seven days for a total of 7,732 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 9.912 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to New Brunswick for a total of 11,175 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 69.19 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Quebec is reporting 8,339 new vaccinations administered for a total of 115,704 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 13.522 per 1,000. There were 5,850 new vaccines delivered to Quebec for a total of 162,175 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 71.35 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Ontario is reporting 14,237 new vaccinations administered for a total of 159,021 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 10.826 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Ontario for a total of 196,125 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.3 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 81.08 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Manitoba is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 12,409 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 9.012 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Manitoba for a total of 25,825 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.9 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 48.05 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Saskatchewan is reporting 1,585 new vaccinations administered for a total of 11,985 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 10.164 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Saskatchewan for a total of 17,575 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.5 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 68.19 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Alberta is reporting 8,809 new vaccinations administered for a total of 66,953 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 15.21 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Alberta for a total of 59,800 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 112 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

British Columbia is reporting 6,316 new vaccinations administered for a total of 69,746 doses given. The province has administered doses at a rate of 13.592 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to British Columbia for a total of 71,200 doses delivered so far. The province has received enough of the vaccine to give 1.4 per cent of its population a single dose. The province has used 97.96 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Yukon is reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 685 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 16.415 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Yukon for a total of 7,200 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 17 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 9.514 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

The Northwest Territories are reporting zero new vaccinations administered for a total of 512 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 11.348 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to the Northwest Territories for a total of 7,200 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 16 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 7.111 per cent of its available vaccine supply.

Nunavut is reporting 121 new vaccinations administered for a total of 521 doses given. The territory has administered doses at a rate of 13.453 per 1,000. There were zero new vaccines delivered to Nunavut for a total of 6,000 doses delivered so far. The territory has received enough of the vaccine to give 15 per cent of its population a single dose. The territory has used 8.683 per cent of its available vaccine supply.



Pfizer cutting back vaccine deliveries to Canada due to production issues

Vaccine delivery cut back

Procurement Minister Anita Anand says production issues in Europe will temporarily reduce Pfizer-BioNTech's ability to deliver vaccines to Canada.

Anand says the U.S. drug-maker is temporarily reducing deliveries because of issues with its European production lines.

She adds that while the company says it will still be able to deliver four million doses by the end of March, that is no longer guaranteed.

"This is unfortunate. However such delays and issues are to be expected when global supply chains are stretched well beyond their limits," Anand said at a news conference Friday. "It's not a stoppage."

Canada has received about 380,000 doses of the vaccine so far, and was supposed to get another 400,000 this month and almost two million doses in February.

The news comes as Ottawa released federal projections that suggest the pandemic may soon exceed levels seen in the first wave, rising to 19,630 cumulative deaths by Jan. 24.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam urged sustained vigilance as a long-range forecast suggested rapid growth in infections will continue without "quick, strong and sustained" measures.

Tam says that's especially so in national hot spots of Quebec and Ontario, where a steady increase in hospitalizations has strained the health system's ability to keep up with critical care demands.



Alberta monolith comes with message to save eastern slopes of Rocky Mountains

Alberta monolith's message

A towering stainless steel monolith set up along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta comes with a message.

The three-metre-tall structure, which reflects its surroundings, is one of many that have been found around the world in recent months. Monoliths have been discovered on a California trail, a Utah desert and at sites across Canada.

Many have popped up without explanation, but the woman who built the one in southern Alberta says she wanted to draw attention to the threats the area is facing as the province moves to open a vast stretch of the mountains to open-pit coal mining.

"This land holds the bones and dreams of our ancestors. This soil remembers the thunder of buffalo hooves and ... still fosters wild grasses. These mountain-fed waters are the lifeblood of southern Alberta," Elizabeth Williams wrote in an Instagram post on her wildstonestories page earlier this month.

"They deserve our attention. They warrant our protection. They are under threat," she wrote.

"The shiny beacon is not the focal point, but the land, which it reflects."

Williams, who couldn't work as a massage therapist during COVID-19 restrictions, said she's been watching some of the provincial government's recent decisions.

"I felt compelled to take action," she said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

Williams is most concerned about the potential for mining along the eastern slopes and the reallocation of water rights in the area.

"It's staggering to me so few Albertans are aware that this is happening," she said.

She wanted to do something to inspire others to pay attention and take action.

Similar concerns were raised this week by Alberta country singer Corb Lund, who criticized the plan for an area that contains the headwaters for freshwater on which millions depend. Coal mining can release selenium, a highly toxic element already poisoning watersheds downstream of coal mines in British Columbia. Paul Brandt, another country music star from Alberta, added his voice to protest the coal mines Thursday.

Williams, who hopes her monolith adds to the growing conversation in Alberta, said she built it after talking to an artist, ordering the stainless steel and borrowing a welding shop. She installed it with the help of volunteers after getting permission from private landowners to put it on their property.

"I thought, 'If I make this to last, if I make this extra beautiful and I get it on private land, it can stay and it can become a beacon for the curious.'"



The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada for Friday, Jan. 15

COVID-19: latest numbers

The latest numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada as of Friday, Jan. 15.

_ Canada: 688,891 confirmed cases (77,956 active, 593,397 resolved, 17,538 deaths).The total case count includes 13 confirmed cases among repatriated travellers.

There were 7,565 new cases Thursday from 89,350 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 8.5 per cent. The rate of active cases is 207.39 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 53,312 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 7,616.

There were 156 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 960 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 137. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.36 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 46.66 per 100,000 people.

There have been 14,870,942 tests completed.

_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 394 confirmed cases (seven active, 383 resolved, four deaths).

There was one new case Thursday from 364 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.27 per cent. The rate of active cases is 1.34 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been two new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 0.77 per 100,000 people.

There have been 75,828 tests completed.

_ Prince Edward Island: 104 confirmed cases (nine active, 95 resolved, zero deaths).

There was one new case Thursday from 405 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.25 per cent. The rate of active cases is 5.73 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there has been two new case. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 84,976 tests completed.

_ Nova Scotia: 1,548 confirmed cases (32 active, 1,451 resolved, 65 deaths).

There were six new cases Thursday from 1,419 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.42 per cent. The rate of active cases is 3.29 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 25 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is four.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 6.69 per 100,000 people.

There have been 192,565 tests completed.

_ New Brunswick: 859 confirmed cases (247 active, 600 resolved, 12 deaths).

There were 23 new cases Thursday from 1,188 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 1.9 per cent. The rate of active cases is 31.8 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 142 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 20.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of three new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is zero. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.06 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 1.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 125,083 tests completed.

_ Quebec: 236,827 confirmed cases (23,208 active, 204,741 resolved, 8,878 deaths).

There were 2,132 new cases Thursday from 8,955 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 24 per cent. The rate of active cases is 273.52 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 16,309 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 2,330.

There were 64 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 317 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 45. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.53 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 104.63 per 100,000 people.

There have been 2,629,203 tests completed.

_ Ontario: 228,310 confirmed cases (29,307 active, 193,814 resolved, 5,189 deaths).

There were 3,326 new cases Thursday from 68,842 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 4.8 per cent. The rate of active cases is 201.19 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 23,715 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 3,388.

There were 62 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 333 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 48. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.33 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 35.62 per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,429,938 tests completed.

_ Manitoba: 26,954 confirmed cases (2,886 active, 23,313 resolved, 755 deaths).

There were 261 new cases Thursday from 2,146 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 12 per cent. The rate of active cases is 210.74 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 1,213 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 173.

There were two new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 38 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is five. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.4 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 55.13 per 100,000 people.

There have been 434,323 tests completed.

_ Saskatchewan: 19,329 confirmed cases (3,859 active, 15,264 resolved, 206 deaths).

There were 312 new cases Thursday from 1,426 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 22 per cent. The rate of active cases is 328.58 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 2,194 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 313.

There were zero new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 29 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is four. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.35 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 17.54 per 100,000 people.

There have been 317,720 tests completed.

_ Alberta: 114,585 confirmed cases (12,434 active, 100,762 resolved, 1,389 deaths).

There were 967 new cases Thursday. The rate of active cases is 284.45 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 6,116 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 874.

There were 21 new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 172 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 25. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.56 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 31.78 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,547,298 tests completed.

_ British Columbia: 59,608 confirmed cases (5,965 active, 52,605 resolved, 1,038 deaths).

There were 536 new cases Thursday from 4,462 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 12 per cent. The rate of active cases is 117.62 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of 3,593 new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is 513.

There were seven new reported deaths Thursday. Over the past seven days there have been a total of 68 new reported deaths. The seven-day rolling average of new reported deaths is 10. The seven-day rolling average of the death rate is 0.19 per 100,000 people. The overall death rate is 20.47 per 100,000 people.

There have been 1,013,053 tests completed.

_ Yukon: 70 confirmed cases (two active, 67 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday from 11 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. The rate of active cases is 4.9 per 100,000 people. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of one new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.45 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,141 tests completed.

_ Northwest Territories: 24 confirmed cases (zero active, 24 resolved, zero deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday from 54 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is zero per 100,000 people.

There have been 8,261 tests completed.

_ Nunavut: 266 confirmed cases (zero active, 265 resolved, one deaths).

There were zero new cases Thursday from 78 completed tests, for a positivity rate of 0.0 per cent. Over the past seven days, there have been a total of zero new cases. The seven-day rolling average of new cases is zero.

There have been no deaths reported over the past week. The overall death rate is 2.58 per 100,000 people.

There have been 6,477 tests completed.



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